Happy Hour: Burn the Turn--On Line Editing

shelburne.jpg
shelburne.jpg

Happy Hour: Burn the Turn--On Line Editing

from 10.00

The difference between your manuscript getting a “yes” or a “no” is often in the details, in cutting what Cormac McCarthy and William Faulkner’s editor called the “extraneous baggage.” In this interactive class, author and former Atlantic staff editor Elizabeth Chiles Shelburne will teach you how to torch your manuscript of the filler words that junk up stories and slow prose. (The class title comes from the number of times the instructor found herself having to cut instances of her characters “turning to stare” or “turning to look.” Good lord.) Of course, everyone’s list is slightly different, so through the instructor’s examples and a brainstorming session, we will establish a list of words or phrases to hunt for and then strike out on the prowl, using Find and Replace as our weapon of choice. As a group, we will find those tic words, laugh at ourselves when necessary, and brainstorm cuts or replacements. This kind of editing can help you get to the heart of your prose, but is also easy to accomplish in snatches of time here and there.

Class participants should bring their computers, a willingness both to share their words and laugh at the instances of their use, and, if desired, some purse beer. You will leave the class with a cleaner manuscript and a toolkit for line-editing that will leave you one step closer to being ready to submit!

When: Thursday, October 10, 5:30 - 6:30 pm

Where: Porch HQ: 2811 Dogwood Pl., 37204

Libations: Indeed.

$10 members, $15 non-members


Membership:
Quantity:
Add To Cart

About the Facilitator: Elizabeth Chiles Shelburne grew up reading, writing, and shooting in East Tennessee. After graduating from Amherst College, she worked at The Atlantic Monthly. Her nonfiction work has been published in The Atlantic MonthlyBoston Globe, and Globalpost, among others, and her short fiction has appeared in The Broad River Review and Barren Magazine.  Her essay on how killing a deer made her a feminist was published in Click! When We Knew We Were Feminists, edited by Courtney E. Martin and J. Courtney Sullivan. She is a graduate of Grub Street’s Novel Incubator. She lives outside Boston with her husband and four children. 


shelburne.jpg